Category Archives: Stories

To Promote a Cable Network, a Plan to Inundate the Internet

New York Times

By STUART ELLIOTT

Published: December 12, 2005

The MSNBC cable network plans to flood the Internet this week with its largest concentrated online pitch, running advertising on hundreds of Web sites and blogs. The cost of the campaign, to promote three prime-time programs, is estimated at just under $1 million.

MSNBC, owned by Microsoft and the NBC Universal division of General Electric, will promote the shows – with their hosts, Keith Olbermann, Rita Cosby and Joe Scarborough – in ads that are to start appearing tomorrow and continue all day Wednesday. Some ads will promote segments on the shows about life online, like how marketers sponsor “viral” video clips that consumers can forward to each other.

The Wire Q&A: Ted Koppel Remembers the Iran Hostage Crisis

On November 03, 2009 at 1:17 PM

koppel nightline.jpgTed Koppel was ABC’s State Department correspondent when he got a call on Sunday, November 4th, 1979 asking him to come into the studio to report on a developing story in Tehran. Hundreds of radical students had seized the U.S. Embassy denouncing it a “nest of spies” and holding its staff hostage. Koppel was certain the situation would be dispelled quickly, but as the days went on it soon became clear that there would be no speedy resolution and ABC saw an opportunity in the public’s appetite for the story. In response the network created a dedicated nightly program to cover the crisis—Nightline: America Held Hostage—which would eventually become Nightline. GQ’s Sarah Goldstein interviewed Koppel for our oral history of the crisis. Here he talks about media coverage of the crisis and how a story he didn’t want changed his life.

American Profile adds NBC television guide: The Peacock Monitor Staff Reports


CEDAR CREEK LAKE–The very popular American Profile found inside this issue of The Monitor features a brand new eight-page section covering entertainment news and television personalities.
The Peacock, a product of NBC News, will give a colorful and informative “insider’s” view of the television news programs you love to watch.
Publishing Group of America, through its alliance with the NBC network, is proud to bring added value and interest to your newspaper reading.
After this initial offering of The Peacock, you will find it in your American Profile on the first Sunday of every month.
The Monitor brings you American Profile every Sunday.

“The Peacock” was developed by NBC EVP Frank Radice

NBC: An ‘Infront’ Offers Sell-Through Opportunities

Executive Quote and Information Service : EQUISMay 19, 2008

NBC gets an A for effort this year. The fourth-place network unveiled its 2008-2009 schedule to advertisers in early April, dubbing the event an “infront” and stressing “connection”–with viewers and advertisers.

Back then, advertisers welcomed NBC’s early sales pitch, and were specifically heartened by a renewed commitment to an 8 p.m. family hour and the network’s inherently collaborative approach.

Band From TV

Posted: Friday, March 16, 2007 5:48 PM by Jaclyn Levin

(From Lester Holt, TODAY Anchor)

I never take for granted that I get paid to do something I am passionate about: Being a reporter. And so a rare offer to combine that with one of my other passions – music – was beyond my wildest dreams.

I’m just back from a weekend in Hollywood where I had the privilege of joining some other amateur musicians, who also make their livings on TV, to record at the historic Capitol Records studios.

I have played the electric and standup bass since Junior High School, and while I occasionally sit-in at New York City jazz clubs, have never played professionally. Hugh Laurie, star of FOX’s “House,” sings and is an accomplished pianist. Greg Grunberg, who plays the mind-reading cop on NBC’s “Heroes,” also plays a mean set of drums. Bob Guiney, of ABC’s “The View,” and “The Bachelor,” also happens to be an experienced singer. Along with James Denton of “Desperate Housewives,” Bonnie Somerville, formerly of “Kitchen Confidential,” and several other talented musicians they form a group known as “Band from TV.” Grunberg, who is as positive and enthusiastic a guy as you’ll ever meet, formed the band for all the right reasons: To raise money for important causes like pediatric epilepsy research, and to have fun. Today they play various venues around Southern California with all the proceeds going to charity.

The group had never recorded together until they gathered at Capitol Records on a recent Saturday morning to do a couple of songs for the “House” soundtrack CD. Their regular bassist, former child actor Brad Savage was out of town, and the folks at Universal who produce “House,” suggested me as a possible replacement. And so there I was in Capitol’s historic Studio B about to record music with this multi-talented-roster of TV stars and musicians with whom I had never played a single note.

And as if that wasn’t enough pressure, did I mention who was producing this recording session? None other than multi Grammy Award-winning producer David Foster. When he found out the proceeds were going to charity, David gladly cancelled his weekend plans and agreed to help turn us into recording artists.

Turns out in addition to being a terrific actor and musician, Hugh Laurie is also a heck of a musical arranger. We did his funk rendition of “Minnie the Moocher,” along with a reggae-inspired version of “Can’t Always Get what you Want.” But it was David Foster who performed sheer magic on the tunes, working with us as a group, and then one on one to find just the right sound. I laid down bass part after bass part, incorporating Foster’s various suggestions. Then, using an amazing piece of computer software, he combined my best notes and “licks” into a solid bass line. He did the same thing with every instrument and vocal part, and explained it was “no different than what has done for every other artists he has produced,” from Celine Dion, to “Earth, Wind and Fire.” We all ended the weekend agreeing his amazing ear made us all better musicians than we were when we walked in the door.

 

The “House” soundtrack will be released sometime this summer, and you can then judge for yourself whether we’re better off keeping our “day jobs.” WATCH THE VIDEO OF OUR SESSION. It was an experience I won’t soon forget. I made some great new friends. Some you know from TV, some you don’t. But all of them are blessed with big hearts and raw talent, whose music will always leave you on just the right note.

 

Former NATAS President Frank Radice Becomes ON-AIR Pro™ Creative Advisor

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

TV Marketing Legend Joins Thought Development Corp.
Former NATAS President Frank Radice Becomes ON-AIR Pro™ Creative Advisor

LOS ANGELES, CA – December 1st, 2009 – Frank J. Radice, former president and CMO of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (NATAS), is bringing his 37 years of decorated industry experience to Thought Development as Creative Advisor for the ON-AIR Pro™ workflow system.

Incoming search terms:

Definition 6 Appoints Frank Radice as Expert in Residence

NEW YORK, June 15, 2010

 

Definition 6, an integrated interactive agency, today announced its appointment of Frank Radice as expert-in-residence in its New York office.

 

A highly-respected marketing innovator, Radice joined Definition 6 from the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (NATAS), where he was President and Chief Marketing Officer. Prior to NATAS, Radice served as Executive Vice President of Advertising and Promotion at NBC Universal’s “NBC Agency”, where he was responsible for NBC News and MSNBC, as well as NBC Entertainment programs, “Saturday Night Live,” “Late Night with Conan O’Brien,” and “Last Call with Carson Daly.”

 

 

“There are only a handful of broadcast industry marketing executives who are as accomplished and creative as Frank Radice,” said Michael Kogon, CEO, Definition 6. “Our clients and employees will clearly benefit from Frank’s extensive marketing experience and strategic insight into how to effectively engage brands with their customers using new media and traditional media channels.”

 

Radice’s 38-year career in network television spans executive positions at NBC, ABC, CBS and CNN. In 2007, he supervised the creation of a promotional on-line micro site for “Where in the World is Matt Lauer?” and the promotional launch of the 4th hour of “Today on NBC.” In 1996, Radice oversaw the promotion and marketing of the launch of MSNBC, a 24-hour cable and Internet joint venture between NBC News and Microsoft.

 

 

As a journalist, Radice received two Columbia DuPont Awards and a national Emmy Award; as a marketing executive, he is the recipient of the TV Week Magazine/Promax “Campaign of Distinction” award, an inductee into the Promax “Hall of Fame” and was named a “Brand Builder of the Year” by Broadcasting & Cable and Multichannel News magazines. Radice is also an award-winning composer and musician who co-wrote a number of pieces of television music including one of the most successful “NBC Today Show” theme songs, “America’s First Family.”

 

 

“Definition 6 is a new breed of agency that is helping brands transcend their marketing and communications initiatives across new and emerging channels in a very efficient way,” said Frank Radice, expert-in-residence, Definition 6. “We are providing clients with solutions and ideas that are effective — not just creative. In the end, marketing is about delivering break through ideas that can drive revenue and build audience. This is Definition 6’s sweet spot.”

Where in the World is Matt Lauer: On the web


NEW YORK TIMES

By STUART ELLIOTT

Published: April 11, 2007

SINCE 1998, NBC has been sending a “Today” host to far-flung locales like Angkor Wat, Easter Island and Machu Picchu, all for a feature on the show called “Where in the World Is Matt Lauer?” This week, to help promote the next installment, Mr. Lauer is taking his most ambitious foray so far into cyberspace. For the first time, NBC is devoting a special Web site, or a microsite, to the feature, and is selling all the advertising space to a single sponsor, Hyundai Motor America. The microsite (followmatt.com), which went live on Monday, offers visitors a smorgasbord of contents, including humorous video clips, a recap of Mr. Lauer’s seven previous trips, and a contest centered on consumers creating material for the site. The contents are accessible through items arrayed on a virtual desk, covered with what are meant to be Mr. Lauer’s possessions: his passport, iPod, camera, compass and car keys (the fob bears a Hyundai logo, natch).

Frank Radice Becomes Creative Advisor to TDC

VFR now working with

Thought Development & “On-Air Pro.” 

 




A Thought From Here

frankradice_athought-v5.jpg

About ten years ago, I walked into Promax and saw
the booth for ON-AIR Pro™.
These young folks were in there demonstrating
their incredible workflow system.
The first thing that caught my attention
was the opportunity
to put cut promos onto a digital platform,
have people look at those promos, and
give approvals.
You could run an approval process online,
which for us at NBC at that time was a big need.
We were spending millions
of dollars in satellite, transmitting spots
from coast to coast for approval, and here
was an opportunity
to put the burgeoning, young internet to good use.

I thought that was a really good reason to
buy into ON-AIR Pro™ to begin with, but after
doing a little more research, I came to find that this
workflow system was going to make life
a lot easier for us in the promotion business.

If you do on-air promotion,
you need ON-AIR Pro™.
It simply integrates everything that you
could possibly need in a promotion department —
from the time you get an assignment, to the time that:
– the script is written
– spots are cut
– spots are viewed in ON-AIR Pro™ for approval and notes
– spots go back to the producers
– editors make the revisions
– the promos are scheduled through your traffic computers.

All of the paperwork involved in cutting a promo is done for you.

In a real-world scenario, you need to know the length of the cuts
you use in order to pay your music license and your voice-over guys.
You need to know how many versions they did, what their rates are,
whether you are doing a commercial, a pro-mercial, a presentation,
an online spot, a spot for air, or a spot for cable — all of which have
different fee structures for voice-overs. The music information needs
to be sent to the licensing organization, such as ASCAP or BMI, and the
voice-over forms to AFTRA. All of this is done within
the ON-AIR Pro™ system. It is a one-stop shop for everything promos.

 

If you are a promotion department, you need to know about ON-AIR Pro™.
You need to see what it does.
I guarantee that if you can get this system into your department
and get your people to work with it,
you will find that it will make the job easier, save you money, and save
you time. ON-AIR Pro™ is one great product!
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